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From the cost of goods to the China balloon, advertising Jesus and a Los Angeles mural event, TCU and its faculty, students and alumni are in the news.

150th: LA Mural


Feb. 10, 2023
Dallas Innovates
Katherine Beattie, a 2008 graduate of TCU, has lived a life story worth telling. Now TCU has helped celebrate it with a huge mural in Los Angeles鈥攐ne of a series of murals nationwide highlighting alumni who are 鈥渓eading on鈥 in extraordinary ways.


Feb. 9, 2023
Mobility Management 
In Los Angeles this month, you'll find a larger-than-life mural of Katherine Beattie 鈥08, a producer/writer for the popular NCIS television franchise. The mural is part of 罢颁鲍鈥檚 150th-anniversary celebration of alumni. The painting of Beattie, who graduated with a degree in communications in 2008, was unveiled on Feb. 6. 鈥淚 am so grateful to everyone at TCU for broadening my worldview, helping me develop empathy and tapping into the person I wanted to be. It is so meaningful to be celebrated like this and to know that I am viewed as a leader in my community. As one of just a few disabled people working behind the camera in Hollywood, I get to create authentic characters and write storylines that celebrate disability as part of natural human diversity, not something that is sad or tragic,鈥 Beattie said.


Feb. 8, 2023
Fort Worth Business Press
TCU is on the road to continue its 150th anniversary celebration by unveiling a mural honoring 2008 graduate Katherine Beattie, a producer/writer for the popular TV show NCIS. The unveiling featured the second in a nationwide series of hand-painted, large-scale murals highlighting notable Horned Frogs who found personal and professional inspiration while attending TCU.

INSTITUTIONAL


Feb. 22, 2023 
KXAS-TV
The one and only time that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. visited Fort Worth was in October of 1959, and Fort Worth was still in the midst of segregation. Historians say that King was met with hatred and even a bomb threat when he visited, but it also sparked change. Because they could not find a hotel willing to house the civil rights leader, King stayed at a home on in the now-historic Southside neighborhood. He stayed upstairs in Vada Felder鈥檚 home on Stewart Street, and attended a reception at the Bellaire Drive West home of the Revs. Alberta and Harold Lunger, Professor of Social Ethics, Brite College of the Bible (now Brite Divinity School) at 茄子视频.


Feb. 14, 2023
The Dallas Morning News 
In an area blessed with quite a few acoustically outstanding concert halls, 茄子视频 has added yet another. Van Cliburn Concert Hall, in the recently opened TCU Music Center, has a rich spaciousness of sound almost unimaginable in a 717-seat hall. It got a workout on Feb. 11 in a Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra concert led by principal guest conductor Kevin John Edusei.

FACULTY


Feb. 21, 2023
CBS-11
A current case in the high court is exploring if Google can be held responsible for its subsidiary, YouTube, recommending terrorist videos in its algorithm. 鈥淐ertainly, YouTube did not create these videos, but their algorithm pushed these videos to certain people,鈥 Josh Bentley, associate professor and director of graduate studies in strategic communication, said. 鈥淚f the Supreme Court changes the rules of the road on the internet and says 鈥榓lgorithms that promote content can get you sued,鈥 that is going to be a huge transformation in the way all of these function.鈥


Feb. 21, 2023
KERA News
The newest battle centers on criminal district attorneys in Texas' big cities, who are mostly Democrats. Some of these chief prosecutors have told their communities they will not zealously pursue criminal cases against women who seek abortions or families who obtain gender-affirming health care for their children. 鈥淏ills targeting sheriffs who defy state authority seem unlikely,鈥 Emily Farris, associate professor of politicial science, said. 鈥淚n Texas, where you have a conservative Legislature and conservative sheriffs, they鈥檙e going to be less likely to oppose each other.鈥 


Feb. 20, 2023
The Dallas Morning News 
In HBO鈥檚 The Last of Us, a 鈥渮ombie ant鈥 fungus starts to infect humans, causing the end of the world as we know it. The fungus from the show, called Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, exists in real life. Are we in danger of a zombie ant apocalypse anytime soon? Probably not. But there are fungi that can infect humans in Texas and around the world. 鈥淲hen we think of a pandemic today, the coronavirus immediately comes to mind. Viral pandemics aren鈥檛 the same as fungal ones,鈥 according to Floyd Wormley, a researcher of fungal infections and associate provost for research. 鈥淰iruses need to enter the human body and hijack cells to cause disease. Fungi, in contrast, can grow on their own and can cause disease either on or inside the body. But very few fungi can actually survive inside of our bodies and cause disease, he said. 鈥淥ur warm-blooded, bodies are too hot for the fungus to thrive. It鈥檚 too hot in the kitchen, so they cannot handle it.鈥


Feb. 17, 2023
Dallas Observer 
As North Texans tuned into the Super Bowl, many were struck by a pair of slickly produced ads promoting a completely different type of product: Jesus. The 鈥淗e Gets Us鈥 commercials made a lasting impression on viewers and attracted both praise and condemnation from far-flung editorial departments. 鈥淭he size of the 鈥楬e Gets Us鈥 campaign is certainly significant,鈥 J. Sage Elwell, associate professor of religion and art and chair of 罢颁鲍鈥檚 religion department, said. 鈥淲hether folks like it or not, agree with it or disagree, it鈥檚 well done.鈥


Feb. 17, 2023
KBTX-TV (Bryan, TX) 
The price of Bitcoin has soared, it's up almost 40% since the beginning of the year. It briefly hit $24,000 in January, the best month since October 2021. What's next for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies? 鈥淏itcoin鈥檚 price appreciation is actually consistent with other coins鈥 appreciation,鈥 Kelly Slaughter, associate professor of professional practice in the information systems and supply chain management department, said. 鈥淪ince the beginning of the year, Bitcoin is up 43%, Ethereum is up 40%, Dogecoin is up 33% and Cardano is up 63%.鈥


Feb. 17, 2023
Rigzone 
Market watchers are looking at U.S. commercial inventories, Russia鈥檚 production cut, Chinese demand and more. Tom Seng,assistant professor in energy at 罢颁鲍鈥檚 Ralph Lowe Energy Institute, said, 鈥淥il prices are lower week-on-week, largely due to an unexpectedly high increase in U.S. commercial inventories, a potential new release of SPR oil reserves and stock market jitters. And, despite an announced cut in supply by Russia and an upwardly-revised forecast for 2023 global oil demand. Further bearish signals included reduced refinery usage, lower-than-normal heating oil consumption and an eighth straight week of inventory gains.鈥 


Feb. 16, 2023
Dallas Innovates 
Innovations鈥刬n鈥刟rtificial鈥刬ntelligence鈥刟re鈥則ransforming鈥則he鈥剋orkplace,鈥刟nd鈥刬t鈥檚鈥刾redicted that鈥刴illions鈥刼f鈥則oday鈥檚鈥刯obs鈥剋on鈥檛鈥別ven鈥別xist鈥刡y鈥2030. So,鈥刪ow鈥刟re鈥刟rea鈥剈niversities preparing鈥剆tudents鈥刦or鈥則his鈥刲atest鈥刬ndustrial鈥剅evolution?  Liran Ma, computer science professor, is planning to develop a series of real-world, story-based, hands-on learning activities hosted on a unified lab platform to promote Al/ML skills acquisition across STEM majors at the undergraduate level. Ma and other TCU researchers have submitted a grant proposal to the National Science Foundation, aiming to make a broad impact in preparing tomorrow鈥檚 workforce in AI/ML. 


Feb. 16, 2023
Social Geek Radio
Ingrid Schneider and Brett Larimer dive deep into the topic of trauma in the workplace with Amanda Purvis, a trauma expert from 罢颁鲍鈥檚 Karyn Purvis Institute of Child Development. They explore how trauma affects our brains and bodies, how to support employees who have experienced trauma and, most importantly, how to do our own work as leaders to create a safe and supportive workplace. 鈥淭rauma at work is a big topic. It's one that people may be afraid of,鈥 she said.


Feb. 16, 2023 
Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting 
The Arizona-based Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association, a group described as anti-democratic by domestic extremism researchers, is elevating some of its most controversial members鈥攊ncluding those with direct ties to other anti-government and white nationalism movements鈥攊nto formal leadership positions. A recent nationwide survey conducted by The Marshall Project and political scientists at TCU (Emily Farris, associate professor) and Tulane University found nearly half of the 500 sheriffs who completed their survey agreed with CSPOA鈥檚 core claim that a sheriff鈥檚 authority within their county supersedes that of the state or federal government.


Feb. 15, 2023
Fort Worth Report 
Experts say there are benefits to kids attending pre-K programs. 鈥淢any pre-K classrooms include what鈥檚 called a dramatic play center,鈥 Michelle Bauml, associate professor of early childhood learning, said. 鈥淎t about 3 years old, children start to really develop their imagination. Going from hearing a book about restaurants to playing as they work in a restaurant is a connection to reading, which makes it more meaningful. They engage in these conversations that are really imaginative, with rich dialogue,鈥 Bauml said.


Feb. 15, 2023  
MarketWatch 
Prices for many staple consumer products have grown significantly over the past year. Why have used cars, specifically, experienced such a decrease? 鈥淭he year was hit hard after COVID as the supply of chips dried up, and this actually led to spectacular increases in used-car prices,鈥 John T. Harvey, professor of economics, said, adding that 鈥渂ecause things are, while still short of normal, nevertheless getting there, used car prices fell.鈥


Feb. 15, 2023
Local Today 
Texas citizens and journalists often face lengthy litigation over requests for disclosure of records. Proponents of transparency in government say this is happening across Texas. Government officials often require that disclosure requests be submitted for information that is clearly public鈥攅ven if the same information was previously requested and released. Daxton 鈥淐hip鈥 Stewart, professor of media law, said, 鈥淕overnment agencies in Texas have become increasingly hostile to requests for public records and are using tactics designed to keep public information paid for with taxpayers鈥 money private. And some governments are hiring private lawyers, also paid with taxpayers鈥 money, to fight requests for disclosure of records filed by private individuals and journalists.鈥


Feb. 13, 2023
Fox 4
Another object was shot down in Canada and President Biden ordered a third taken down in northern Alaska. Adjunct professor Tracy Walder is a former CIA officer and FBI special agent who specialized in Chinese counterintelligence. She says we may be hearing about these objects more because military officials are more attuned to them. 鈥淥n the other hand, it's frustrating because why haven't we been catching these, right? Why is it just now?鈥


Feb. 12, 2023 
Fort Worth Report 
Two entrepreneurs want to use their platform to lower the barriers to invest in agriculture. There鈥檚 a big demand for funding in the sector because in general, agriculture is an expensive business. Ranches, for example, take a lot of money to start and operate, according to Jeff Geider, director of the Institute of Ranch Management at TCU. 鈥淏uying land, buying livestock, buying whatever necessary equipment 鈥 all the things to operate on a day-to-day basis, it requires a huge amount of capital,鈥 Geider said. 


Feb. 10, 2023
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Jim Marshall,chair of pediatrics at the Anne Burnett Marion School of Medicine at TCU, is a part of the proposed Marvin Nichols Reservoir project that would provide the DFW area with water in the coming decades. Since the turn of the century, DFW water planners have been clear: North Texans are going to need a lot of water in the coming decades, and one way to get it is by building a reservoir about 150 miles away. 鈥淏eing a critical care specialist who鈥檚 resuscitated a lot of children, I can tell you, there鈥檚 always hope,鈥 Marshall said.


Feb. 8, 2023 
WFAA 
The new Election Integrity Task Force has been launched in Tarrant County. 鈥淭his has been an issue that several people countywide and Tarrant County ran on in the election of 2022,鈥 Jim Riddlesperger, political science professor, said. 鈥淭here has been precious little 鈥 if any 鈥 evidence that there has been voter fraud of any kind, but that really doesn鈥檛 mitigate the fact that many voters believe that there has been voter fraud.鈥 


Feb. 9, 2023
News Bulletin 247 
Modern television fiction does not shy away from polarizing topics. Today, for a series or a film to be successful, it must actively participate in the social process. 鈥淟aziness, stupidity, gluttony or non-existent sex life are some of the concepts associated with fat people,鈥 Jeanine Gailey, sociology professor, said. 鈥淲hen women are not desirable, according to beauty standards, they are not shown on the screen,鈥 she notes. 


Feb. 8, 2023
KERA
Nearly 50 years after its first residency at TCU, Dance Theatre of Harlem returned to campus this week. 鈥淒ance Theatre of Harlem really started the conversation and opened up the field of classical ballet, which had been pretty exclusionary to dancers of color. And that鈥檚 a significant achievement,鈥 Keith Saunders, assistant professor of professional practice, said. 鈥淭hat conversation is still being had today, and that work is still being done.鈥 Saunders and his wife, Kellye Saunders, an adjunct professor, both work at 罢颁鲍鈥檚 School for Classical & Contemporary Dance and are alumni of Dance Theatre of Harlem.


Feb. 4, 2023
KERA
As all eyes were trained on the sky when a suspected Chinese spy balloon worked its way across the United States. TCU adjunct professor and former CIA officer and FBI special agent Tracy Walder couldn鈥檛 help but reflect on her past career. 鈥淢y job was to catch Chinese here in the United States,鈥 said Walder. 鈥淚 think what the public doesn't realize is that so many countries, China, us, Russia, have satellites up in space that spy. We just don't see it every day with our naked eye. So, to see it kind of like this invading our air space in such an obvious way was very surprising to me,鈥 she said. 


Feb. 4, 2023
Fort Worth Report
Last month, the Fort Worth Report invited two TCU researchers, Jacqueline Lambiase and Ashley English, who teach at 罢颁鲍鈥檚 Bob Schieffer College of Communication, to envision a session on listening as part of this publication鈥檚 Candid Conversations where they emphasize listening as an important tool for relationship-building, problem-solving and even reconciliation. For three years, they have worked on a small research team to study listening, especially related to cities, and how they focus on better engagement with all residents. The main focus of this work centers on the voices of Black stakeholders.


Feb. 2, 2023  
Fort Worth Report 
The first Barbershop Talk Therapy in 2023 took place at the Lake Como House of Fades Barbershop in Fort Worth. Attendees receive free haircuts and health screenings, including blood pressure, glucose readings, some light blood work, all led by David Capper, academic chair of clinical sciences at the Burnett School of Medicine at TCU. Meanwhile, Brian Dixon, a psychiatrist and assistant professor of clinical sciences at the medical school, facilitated a discussion among the barbers and patrons. 


Feb. 1, 2023
Yahoo News 
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences received public backlash following its Oscar nomination announcement, with critics raising questions about whether the grassroots campaign violated any rules and if the nomination should have instead gone to a Black woman. The ongoing controversy marks the latest instance of the Academy being called out for its lack of diversity when considering who gets an Oscar. 鈥淒avis and Deadwyler not making the nominations list did not come as a surprise,鈥 Frederick W. Gooding Jr., Dr. Ronald E. Moore Honors Professor of Humanities, said. 鈥淥verall, the Academy鈥檚 patterns are always consistent.鈥

ALUMNI


Feb. 16, 2023
Fort Worth Report
After a decade and a half in corporate America, David Aspinall MBA 鈥18 was looking for something different and more entrepreneurial. And, maybe, something a little more meaningful to the community at large. The Manchester, England, native had found his way to North Texas and Fort Worth in 2015 as a regional president for Sprint. Part of what began changing his thought process was getting his master鈥檚 in business administration from 罢颁鲍鈥檚 Neeley School of Business. 鈥淕oing to Neeley was one of the really amplifying factors of my journey from being a company executive into a more entrepreneurial way of thinking,鈥 Aspinall said.


Feb. 13, 2023
Fort Worth Report 
Fort Worth resident Henry Adiletta 鈥22 and his friends witnessed something they never thought they would see: their alma mater, TCU, beating the University of Michigan in the College Football Playoff semifinal, 51-45. To remember that historic moment, Adiletta gathered his friends, hugged shoulders and turned their backs to the camera to show off their matching jerseys. 鈥淭hat was definitely a once-in-a-lifetime experience,鈥 Adiletta said. 鈥淲e all got matching Kell jerseys just for fun because we lived on Kell Street for two years.鈥

STUDENTS 


February 2023
Sage Journals
Leslie Ekpe, president of the Graduate Student Senate was published on the topic of equity and education in society. 鈥淒espite a pandemic that ravaged Black communities with brutal, life-threatening circumstances and months of protesting institutional injustices and extrajudicial police brutality, Black people still found joy in moments of unrest,鈥 she wrote.


Feb. 10, 2023
KERA News
Cry Havoc Theatre has been unique in North Texas. The high school students in the company research topics most teen theaters would never touch: gun violence, sex education, border crossings. Then they write a play and perform it. 鈥淚t's incredibly special,鈥 Lillie Davidson, first-year journalism student at TCU, said. She's appeared in seven of Cry Havoc's productions, including 鈥淏abel,鈥 the one about gun violence. 鈥淚've done theater in a lot of places,鈥 Davidson said, 鈥渁nd I don't think that I've found somewhere else that allowed me to have a really deep connection with the work that I was doing.鈥

ATHLETICS 


Feb. 21, 2023
Fort Worth Magazine 
Fortunes can quickly change, like the story of Max Duggan, the TCU quarterback and this year鈥檚 winner of the Davey O鈥橞rien Award, as prestigious an honor a college football player can earn, save for the most respected of its kind, the Heisman. 鈥溓炎邮悠 a year ago, I came here for dinner with family friends and I never would have thought I鈥檇 be here a year later winning the Davey O鈥橞rien Award,鈥 said Duggan, decked out for the occasion in his finest black tie, his perpetually bloody elbow, on the face of it, patched and anointed with Neosporin. 鈥淚t鈥檚 pretty special to be sitting up here. I鈥檝e been surrounded by so many great people 鈥 family, friends, players, coaching staff, people back home 鈥 helping me get to this point. To be able to share this with them means the most to me.鈥


Feb. 21, 2023
Fort Worth Star-Telegram 
For the second straight year, the No. 3 TCU Men鈥檚 Tennis team hoisted the trophy as winners of the ITA Indoor National Championships. The team played their instate conference for No. 8 Texas. The Frogs swept the Longhorns 4-0 to win the Natty. 


Feb. 20, 202s
Fort Worth Star-Telegram 
TCU Basketball forward JaKobe Coles experienced plenty of adversity at the start of his collegiate career. After a decorated prep career at Denton Guyer, Coles signed with Butler, but the summer before his freshman season was impacted by COVID-19 and limited his options to prepare for the college game. Coles still carved out a nice role with the Bulldogs but tore his meniscus in 2021. After the season, he transferred closer to home to TCU but still couldn鈥檛 put in the proper time due to recovering from the injury. Now Coles is in the best stretch of his career with five double-digit scoring games in the last seven outings. 鈥淚 think it just came from the work and consistency that I was providing the team this summer,鈥 Coles said. 鈥淚 just worked hard all summer and just knew that if I was able to get a couple of opportunities to play a little bit more this season, I would be able to show I had gotten better.鈥


Feb. 8, 2023
Fort Worth Star-Telegram 
The 2023 NFL Draft combine will have plenty of TCU representation. Nine players from the national runners-up received an invite to Indianapolis for the combine, which will be held from Feb. 28 to March 6. It鈥檚 another major milestone for Sonny Dykes and the TCU program after five players were invited to the Reese鈥檚 Senior Bowl, the top postseason collegiate all-star game. Here鈥檚 the complete list of the Horned Frogs that will be in Indy: Alan Ali, Steve Avila, Derius Davis, Max Duggan, Tre'Vius Hodges-Tomlinson, Dylan Horton, Quentin Johnston, Kendre Miller and Dee Winters. 


Feb. 4, 2023
Fort Worth Star-Telegram 
The 2023 Reece鈥檚 Senior Bowl is in the books. A record five TCU players competed in the exhibition, second most to only the University of Alabama. The Senior Bowl is an all-star game that allows top college draft prospects to showcase their skills to NFL coaches, scouts and media. The Senior Bowl is preceded by a week of practice that pits the participants against each other in various drills and game situations for evaluation. QB Max Duggan was selected as the American team鈥檚 QB practice player of the week heading into the Senior Bowl. LB Dee Winters was selected as the American team鈥檚 LB practice player of the week.

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