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From surpassing its $1 billion campaign goal to the medical school鈥檚 impact on the economy and Frogs on Fourth: A Purple Pop-Up, TCU is in the news.  

INSTITUTIONAL    

 
Oct. 14, 2023 
Fort Worth Report 
A few weeks ago, on his way home from class, TCU Burnett School of Medicine third-year student鈥Kevin Chao鈥痭oticed a crash victim on the side of the interstate and pulled over to assist. Inside Schollmaier Arena on Oct. 12, TCU Chancellor Victor J. Boschini, Jr. told an audience of TCU boosters, donors and city leaders who contributed more than $1 billion to the university during its Lead On: A Campaign for TCU fundraising effort, that students like Chao are evidence that their money isn鈥檛 wasted. Boschini told the audience to watch the impact reverberate across Fort Worth. 鈥淥ne of the hallmarks of TCU is that everyone鈥檚 connected at every level, and they try to make those connections to try to make the world a better place,鈥 Boschini said. 鈥淲hen could we more need the world to be a better place than now?鈥 

 
Oct. 13, 2023 
Fort Worth Business Press 
TCU announced Oct. 12 that the university has surpassed its goal for the most ambitious philanthropic campaign in TCU鈥檚 150-year history. 鈥淭hanks to many generous and loyal supporters, 茄子视频 has achieved and surpassed our bold goal for Lead On: A Campaign for TCU,鈥 said Chancellor鈥Victor J. Boschini, Jr.鈥鈥淔or all of us at TCU, this is an incredible moment to reflect upon the impact of this effort for the future of our university. It is difficult to overstate the importance of this investment by so many who care so deeply about TCU鈥檚 students, faculty and staff.鈥濃 

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
TCU鈥痗apped off its 150 anniversary celebrations Thursday with an announcement the university surpassed its $1 billion fundraising goal. Over 57,000 individual donors contributed to the 鈥淟ead On鈥 campaign, which will go to strengthen the university鈥檚 endowment, support student scholarships, and help expand the university through additional faculty and staff. 鈥淭he vision is to get more people to choose to come to TCU and then be able to provide them the scholarship to do that,鈥 Chancellor Victor J. Boschini, Jr. said.  

 
Oct. 11, 2023 
The Dallas Morning News鈥 
There鈥檚 a building boom on college campuses across North Texas, with over $1 billion in construction projects underway to train future nurses, scientists, biomedical engineers, doctors and business leaders. In recent weeks,鈥痶he鈥痭ew building for the鈥Anne Burnett Marion School of Medicine at TCU鈥痠s under construction, with completion expected in 2024. The four-story, 100,000-square-foot building will be in Fort Worth鈥檚 Near Southside neighborhood that鈥檚 home to several hospitals. It will have an anatomy lab, a simulation center, and suites for students to practice clinical skills, university officials said. The school is expected to generate about 31,000 jobs for North Texas and produce an economic impact of about $4 billion by 2030 according to a Tripp Umbach study. 

 
Oct. 11, 2023 
Fort Worth Magazine鈥 
A new documentary that is currently in negotiations for worldwide streaming distribution, will be making its big screen debut right here in Cowtown. 鈥淐rescendo,鈥 a documentary that follows the 2022 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, is scheduled to make its North American premiere on Oct. 26 at the Van Cliburn Concert Hall. 鈥淲e are delighted to once again welcome the Cliburn to 茄子视频,鈥 said Chancellor鈥Victor J. Boschini, Jr.鈥淲ith such a long and storied history together, it is especially meaningful to have them host this screening during our Sesquicentennial celebration. We are extremely proud of the beautiful, state-of-the-art Van Cliburn Concert Hall at TCU that enhances our students鈥 academic experience and honors the life and legacy of its namesake.鈥 

 
Oct. 11, 2023 
WFAA-TV  
TCU is celebrating its 150th anniversary with Frogs on Fourth: A Purple Pop-Up in downtown Fort Worth. 鈥淲e were established as one of the first co-education institutions west of the Mississippi. We educated men and women together, and that really speaks to how we are so innovative at our core,鈥 Tracy Syler-Jones, vice chancellor for marketing and communication, said. 鈥淎 hundred and fifty years later, we just graduated our 100,000th alum. We also graduated the first students from our Burnett School of Medicine. We鈥檙e happy to share the history with as many people as we can.鈥 

 
Oct. 9, 2023 
D Magazine鈥 
Just one month after the NCAA approved new rules that paved the way for college athletes to get paid for their name, image and likeness (NIL), in Fort Worth,鈥疶CU鈥痟as launched an NIL curriculum and workshops within the鈥疦eeley School of Business. Now, more than two years into the NIL age, 鈥渧irtually 100 percent鈥 of TCU鈥檚 more than 500 student-athletes participate in the Neeley NIL curriculum each year, according to university president and Neeley NIL co-founder鈥Daniel Pullin. TCU was the first Power 5 university to establish NIL curriculum. 鈥淭he courses set up students for success now in understanding how to leverage their brand, and for the next 50 years after their playing career,鈥 Pullin said. 鈥淭he way we look at it is the Supreme Court ruling planted 500 entrepreneurs on our campus overnight.鈥 

 
Oct. 2, 2023 
The Wall Street Journal 
Several small to midsize private colleges made the top 10, according to a student survey conducted for the WSJ/College Pulse ranking, including鈥茄子视频鈥痑t No. 5. The top-ranked schools on the list received the highest scores for their learning facilities 鈥 a category that includes classroom spaces, internet reliability and other campus amenities 鈥 followed by student recommendations.  

FACULTY 

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
Swift Telecast 
In the fourth quarter of 2021, a Tesla employee and a tech industry researcher jointly filed a whistleblower complaint to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, expressing concerns that the car company may have violated the law repeatedly, affecting shareholders, employees and customers. Karen Nelson, M.J. Neeley Professor of Accounting, previously served as an advisor to the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. After reviewing the redacted version of the whistleblower complaint,鈥痵he said, 鈥淭esla鈥檚 information systems don鈥檛 seem to be very transparent and robust for internal people, which then leads to questions about how the auditor navigated those systems in their internal control testing and became comfortable with using the data being produced by it.鈥 

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
willmarradio.com 
Following Hamas鈥 attack on Israel, the United States has sent a clear message of deterrence to prevent the conflict from spreading.鈥Ralph Carter, Piper Professor of political science, said President Biden has historically been 鈥渃autious鈥 in sending U.S. troops into battle. 鈥淗is experience in Washington over 40 years or more suggests that once you start something like that, you have no idea where it鈥檚 going to end,鈥 Carter said.  

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
Fort Worth Report 
A video showing a group wearing Nazi insignia at the Torchy鈥檚 Tacos in Fort Worth stirred conversations about what people can or should do in similar situations. The group鈥檚 generally protected by the First Amendment, said鈥Daxton Stewart, a professor focusing on media law and the First Amendment.鈥淵ou can鈥檛 arrest somebody who鈥檚 going out in public and saying racist stuff,鈥 he said. 鈥淵ou can see them do it. You can judge them accordingly. You can speak back at them. But the state can鈥檛 arrest them and put them in jail. There鈥檚 no hate speech exception for the First Amendment.鈥 

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
The Dallas Morning News 
Texas鈥 prolific Permian Basin set the scene for the largest oil-and-gas deal of the last two decades with Exxon Mobil鈥檚 $59.5 billion takeover of Irving-based Pioneer Natural Resources. The megadeal also cements the energy giant鈥檚 future in fossil fuels as it becomes the nation鈥檚 dominant producer of shale oil. Tom Seng, assistant professor of professional practice in TCU鈥檚 Ralph Lowe Energy Institute, said, 鈥淚t鈥檚 entirely possible that, with Exxon鈥檚 balance sheet, they can infuse a substantial amount of capital into new drilling and production, which could lead to lower prices at the pump.鈥  

 
Oct. 9, 2023 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
Four months after they failed to reach a deal, Texas lawmakers returned to Austin to try a second time to pass a statewide school voucher program. Jim Riddlesperger, political science professor, said that in rural communities, where private schools are much less common and traditional school districts are often the only option, many voters see education savings accounts as a plan that would only benefit wealthy people in big cities and suburbs. 
 
 
Oct. 7, 2023 
Fort Worth Report鈥 
Palm Medical Centers 鈥 a provider of primary care services for adults aged 65 and older 鈥 expanded to Tarrant County. Dr. Stuart Pickell, associate professor at the Burnett School of Medicine, was appointed to serve as its medical director for the provider鈥檚 clinic in Fort Worth鈥檚 Medical District.  

 
Oct. 6, 2023 
The Dallas Morning News鈥 
A 鈥渞ing of fire鈥 annular solar eclipse was visible in DFW skies Oct. 14. The sliver of visible sun has a high surface brightness and can damage the naked eye, said鈥Douglas Ingram, physics and astronomy instructor. He recommends purchasing eclipse glasses, which block out much of the light and are available for a few dollars online. 

 
Oct. 3, 2023 
Fort Worth Report 
Germ谩n Guti茅rrez, professor of orchestral studies, led the university鈥檚 orchestra ensemble at the TCU Latin American Music Festival. 鈥淵ou don鈥檛 know how great it feels to see this building full of young musicians who are here for this wonderful piece of music, for the orchestra,鈥 Guti茅rrez said. 鈥淪o many young musicians in high school. I hope that you will be sitting here soon.鈥 Area high school mariachi bands 鈥 North Side Mariachi Espuelas de Plata and R.L. Paschal Mariachi Panteras 鈥 performed with the鈥疶CU Symphony Orchestra鈥痑t the TCU School of Music鈥檚 13th Biennial Latin American Music Festival. World-renowned Venezuelan artists Pacho Flores and Eddy Marcano played beside them. 

 
Oct. 2, 2023 
KBIA-FM (Columbia, MO)鈥 
Following language from a June Supreme Court decision, the University of Missouri System Board of Curators voted Sept. 7 to approve amendments to the system鈥檚 Collected Rules and Regulations, specifically the definitions of stalking and threats in the Standard of Conduct and sexual harassment policies. 鈥淭he bar is now higher to punish students or employees that engage in stalking or threatening behavior, and that does not make the world a better or safer place for those who are being stalked or threatened,鈥 said Daxton 鈥淐hip鈥 Stewart, professor and assistant provost for research compliance journalism. 

STUDENTS 

 
Oct. 11, 2023 
KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, TX)  
Graduate student鈥Andre Giammattei organized a hair donation drive on campus to raise awareness for childhood cancer and collect hair to be made into wigs. 鈥淥ne of my older cousins put on a hair donation when we were younger,鈥 Giammattei said. 鈥淎nd then, unfortunately, in 2020, a friend of mine who we used to play basketball together when we were younger, passed away from cancer, and I was trying to figure out a way to honor him and his memory.鈥  

 
Oct. 11, 2023 
Fort Worth Magazine鈥  
The name on the back of No. 43 on the TCU football sideline would catch anybody鈥檚 eye: 鈥淪taubach.鈥 To鈥Joe Staubach, Roger Staubach is 鈥済randdad,鈥 first and foremost. Yes, of course, he knows all about the history, legend and heritage of the infamous Dallas Cowboys quarterback, but Joe is living his own life as a redshirt freshman walk-on wide receiver at TCU.鈥淚 started to understand that my name, you know, came with recognition and people kind of noticed it,鈥 he said. 

 
Oct. 5, 2023 
KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, TX)  
Sophomore Claudia Tiffany Rodriguez has danced Ballet Folklorico at TCU tailgates, at a baseball Cinco de Mayo game, and a volleyball game for Hispanic Heritage Day. 鈥淭hat was heartwarming because when I first started, not that I didn't believe in myself, but I didn't believe how far I would get,鈥 Rodriguez said. Last month, Rodriguez applied to TCU to start a Ballet Folklorico organization on campus. 鈥淚t鈥檚 very beautiful not just to share the culture within, like, my heritage, but it鈥檚 also very amazing to share with people that don鈥檛 know what Ballet Folklorico is,鈥 Rodriguez said. Rodriguez hopes to open her own Ballet Folklorico dance studio after she graduates from TCU. 

 
Oct. 5, 2023 
KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, TX)鈥  
Days after Tarrant County leaders voted to strip state funds from Girls Inc. of Tarrant County, some are rallying to support the nonprofit. As the first and second members of their family to graduate from high school, sisters鈥疞颈锄产别迟丑鈥痑苍诲鈥Jimena Maldonado鈥痑re鈥痯reparing for careers in business and the restaurant industry. 鈥淕irls Inc. of Tarrant County pushed us and really inspired us to just know that we can do it too and see that people like us did and routed us there,鈥 said Maldonado. 鈥淲e were taught about financial literacy, how to apply to colleges, they even taught us about financial aid.鈥  

ALUMNI

 
Oct. 15, 2023 
Times of San Diego鈥 
Mariana Fern谩ndez鈥06 was always swimming or running or doing some form of exercise. Years later, Fern谩ndez has turned that passion for health and exercise into a thriving career in the fitness industry, becoming the first Spanish bilingual instructor for Peloton, the popular exercise equipment and online streaming company. 鈥淚 feel really lucky to have a job like this because it鈥檚 truly fusing all of the passions, athleticism that I鈥檝e had my whole life,鈥 she said.  

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
Fort Worth Report 
Growing up,鈥Donna Craddock, who graduated in 2006 with a master鈥檚 degree in Christian service from Brite Divinity School, read prolifically, along with her sister. Both of their parents were readers, too. 鈥淏ooks are kind of in our blood,鈥 Donna said.鈥疶hat passion for reading led the sisters to open The Dock Bookshop at 6637 Meadowbrook Drive. They call the 4,000-square-foot space one of the 鈥渓argest African American-owned, full-service bookstores in Texas and the Southwest.鈥  

 
Oct. 12, 2023 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
A TCU fraternity organized a flag football game to honor鈥疻es Smith, the 21-year-old junior who was fatally shot in Fort Worth this fall. All proceeds from Touchdowns for Wes will go to the Wes Smith Memorial Fund, a scholarship set up in Smith鈥檚 honor. 鈥淲es loved TCU more than anyone, and giving someone else the opportunity to attend would be what he would鈥檝e wanted,鈥 Kappa Sigma alumnus鈥Dylan York 鈥22 said. 

 
Oct. 6, 2023 
Star Beacon 
Artist Allison鈥疶isdale R茅gnier 鈥85 鈥is leading an art workshop, called Paint Your HeArt Out. R茅gnier is a missionary artist from Nice, France, who is spending six months in the U.S. pursuing a variety of artistic and development opportunities. 鈥淭hey will reflect on their lives, learn more about themselves and take stock of their faith journey,鈥 she said. 鈥淧aint Your HeArt Out is a powerful tool for processing strong emotions 鈥 from grief to gratitude.鈥 R茅gnier has a bachelor鈥檚 degree in fine art and interior design from鈥疶CU. 

ATHLETICS

 
Oct. 2, 2023 
Community Impact Newspaper鈥 
Hebron High School honored late football coach鈥David Brian Brazil and unveiled the renamed football stadium before the school鈥檚 homecoming game Sept. 29. Brazil coached at the school for 23 years until his retirement in May 2022. He passed away in July. Brazil earned All-Southwest Conference honors during his college football career at鈥疶CU鈥痑nd played in the NFL with the Houston Oilers after graduation. 

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