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From the transformation of college radio to Texas wildfires and the penalty of an early spring, TCU and its faculty and alumni are in the news.  

 
Feb. 27, 2024 
BNN Breaking鈥 
罢颁鲍鈥疧辫别谤补鈥檚 production of 鈥淚nto the Woods鈥 has become a rapid sell-out, demonstrating the burgeoning interest and growth within the program. With tickets for the scheduled performances from March 1-3 selling out quickly, additional shows were added to accommodate the high demand, yet the expansion was not enough to satisfy all interested spectators. This incident has highlighted the program鈥檚 increasing popularity under the leadership of鈥Corey Trahan, who has overseen a 30% rise in enrollment since last year.  

 
Feb. 23, 2024 
BNN Breaking鈥 
Once limited to a modest broadcast of just five hours a day,鈥疜罢颁鲍 has not only expanded its airtime to a relentless 24/7 cycle but has also dramatically broadened its reach across the sprawling Dallas-Fort Worth area. This remarkable journey from a small, campus-bound entity to a digital powerhouse encapsulates a broader narrative of resilience and adaptation within the college radio sector. At the helm of this evolution stands co-manager Janice McCall, a figure who has witnessed firsthand the station's metamorphosis over her 21-year tenure. As KTCU celebrates its 60-year legacy, its journey from a small college radio station to a digital broadcasting leader mirrors the broader shifts in the radio industry and media consumption.  

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
Fort Worth Report鈥 
The TCU School of Music鈥痺ill host the U.S. Navy Band Sea Chanters at the inspiring Van Cliburn Concert Hall at TCU. The free and family-friendly concert will feature a variety of music for the community to enjoy. The U.S. Navy Band Sea Chanters ensemble performs a variety of music ranging from traditional choral music, including sea chanteys and patriotic fare, to opera, Broadway and contemporary music. The Sea Chanters chorus is frequently found at the center of high-profile national events. At home in Washington, D.C., the group performs for the president, vice president and numerous congressional, military and foreign dignitaries.  

 
Feb. 20, 2024 
Fort Worth Report鈥 
Beginning March 4,鈥Rev. Stephen Cady鈥becomes the third permanent president in鈥疊rite Divinity School鈥s鈥109-year history. Until 20 years ago, Brite functioned as a part of鈥疶CU and had a dean but no president, according to the school. 鈥淚 am doing my best to sit down with every staff member, every faculty member, every trustee member and as many students as possible to just hear how they got here, why they stay and what they鈥檙e hoping for. So that together we can find a path forward,鈥 Cady said.  

FACULTY

 
Feb. 29, 2024
KPRC-TV (Houston, TX) 
The Smokehouse Creek Fire has burned over a million acres in the Texas Panhandle, the largest recorded fire in Texas history. Some of that land is home to cattle. The cattle industry is the bread and butter for many in the Panhandle. 鈥淭he Texas Panhandle right now houses greater than 80% of Texas鈥 beef cattle population鈥 said鈥Matthew Garcia, director of Ranch Management at鈥疶CU. Although the Panhandle is great for the cattle industry, wildfires of this magnitude pose a threat to the supply. Garcia says cattle supply is already at a 70-year low across the country. 鈥淪o right now, we don鈥檛 know the number of cattle we鈥檙e actually losing in these fires. It could be tens of thousands which further impacts our inventory,鈥 he said. 

 
Feb. 26, 2024 
The Utah Statesman鈥 
The women鈥檚 liberation movement arose alongside the Vietnam War in the late 1960s, taking inspiration from the Civil Rights Movement and anti-war sentiment. Protests and new ideas regarding feminism would characterize this era of change.鈥Kara Dixon Vuic is the鈥疞Cpl. Benjamin W. Schmidt Professor of War, Conflict, and Society in 20th-Century America at鈥疶CU.鈥淭his is the era of women marching in the streets for equal rights,鈥 Vuic said. 鈥淵ou have women doing all kinds of things and going to war in Vietnam, doing important things there.鈥濃 

 
Feb. 26, 2024 
KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, TX)鈥 
Record warmth in February comes with a trade-off. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, DFW is one of the most challenging places to live if you suffer from seasonal allergies. Tree pollen is the biggest agitator this week, fueled by warm winds. 鈥淚t plays a huge factor. The wind here transmits most of the pollen and dust,鈥 said鈥Dr. Nikhil Bhayani, associate professor with the鈥疊urnett School of Medicine at TCU. Doctors encourage people to start taking their allergy medication and avoid being outside on the windiest days, but Bhayani said you should still enjoy the outdoors when you can. 鈥淒on鈥檛 let the pollen stop you,鈥 Bhayani said. 

 
Feb. 26, 2024 
KPRC-TV (Houston, TX)鈥 
The National Education Association says nine in 10 public schools struggled to hire teachers at the start of the school year. Teachers have high burnout levels, with more than half of educators thinking about leaving the profession altogether. A.I. expert and instructor of marketing Elijah Clark, has this to say: 鈥淭he main issue is that teachers are just overburdened with the amount of work they have to produce. Not only that, you also have their parents now wanting to be more involved with their child鈥榮 curriculum.鈥 Regarding A.I. and how A.I. can be helpful in creating what's known as personalized learning, Clark said, 鈥淪tudents could get instant feedback (from A.I.) where the student can get the lesson and review done right there with the computer system, versus having to wait for the test to be submitted and graded, then returned, then set up a private meeting with that teacher.鈥 

 
Feb. 23, 2024 
Weirton Daily Times鈥 
罢丑别鈥Rev. Lance Pape, professor of preaching at Brite Divinity School,鈥痺ill serve as the keynote speaker for Bethany College鈥檚 2024 Oreon E. Scott Lectures, scheduled for April 8-9 at the First Christian Church in Washington, Pennsylvania. Ordained and having served congregations in Texas, Alabama and New York, Pape embodies a dedication to theological scholarship and pastoral ministry.  

 
Feb. 22, 2024 
Fort Worth Report鈥 
Dr. Jamie Erwin鈥痜eels all of her patients are special. But even she admits the baby she helped deliver Jan. 5 of this year will stand out. Erwin, who is an assistant professor at鈥痶he Burnett School of Medicine at TCU, was called by the Fort Worth Zoo to help with the birth of a baby gorilla via emergency cesarean section after life-threatening complications endangered the health of the mother, Sekani. 鈥淚t was an unforgettable highlight of my life and my career, just one of the coolest days ever,鈥 said the 42-year-old Erwin, a Fort Worth native. 鈥淚t was really just this beautiful team effort of veterinarians coming together with medical doctors for this very special delivery,鈥 Erwin said.鈥  

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
While the Arlington Police Department is conducting internal affairs and criminal investigations of a shooting in which an officer killed an armed driver, two law enforcement experts who reviewed video of the incident say the shooting appeared to be justified. Johnny Nhan, a professor in TCU鈥檚 Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, analyzed the bodycam footage. The Arlington officer had a few reasons that justified him to act aggressively and fire his gun, according to Nhan, who is also a reserve officer with the Fort Worth Police Department. 鈥淗is initial non-disclosure of the gun when asked meant he was not to be trusted,鈥 Nhan said, 鈥溾ore generally, the officer had probable cause to pull him over, has the authority to have him get out of his car, and had reason to believe he was not going to comply and instead was going to act aggressively, possibly shooting.鈥 

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
狈别飞蝉飞别别办鈥 
Vladimir Putin has faced setbacks during his full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Now, two years into the war, circumstances appear to be turning in his favor, and his grip on power shows no sign of waning. 鈥淒omestically, Vladimir Putin is stronger than before,鈥濃Ralph Carter, political science professor, told Newsweek. 鈥淗e鈥檚 rallied public opinion behind his leadership, calling Western sanctions an attack that he's neutralized. He鈥檚 also neutralized domestic opposition, with the deaths of Alexei Navalny, his most prominent critic, and Yevgeny Prigozhin, the leader of The Wagner Group. The message to Russians鈥攊f it can happen to them, it can happen to you.鈥 

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
KERA News (Dallas, TX)鈥 
The Texas Republican Party has a strong grip on power at every level of elected office in Texas. But it鈥檚 still dealing with internal turmoil. Many current Texas House members who鈥檝e long identified as conservatives have been called RINOs 鈥 Republicans in Name Only. That includes Jeff Leach, who co-authored the bill that became the state鈥檚 constitutional carry law. Leach has faced backlash for voting to impeach Attorney General Ken Paxton.鈥Jim Riddlesperger, political science professor, said Republicans who don鈥檛 feel loyal to those figures but still have conservative values feel the tension. 鈥淚t makes for people feeling uncomfortable in their political party home,鈥 Riddlesperger said. 

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, TX)鈥 
The relationship between Assistant Professor Dr. Jamie Erwin and student鈥Carter Clatterbuck鈥痑t the Burnett School of Medicine at TCU is more like a marathon...figuratively and literally. The women first met when Clatterbuck was an undergrad at TCU. Now she鈥檚 a third-year med student. That鈥檚 where the figurative marathon comes in. 鈥淲e actually ran into each other again at the Cowtown Trailblazer running group,鈥 Erwin said. The women ran in February鈥檚 Cowtown Marathon together. 鈥淲e were both athletes growing up. We鈥檝e talked about that and how we transitioned to be distance runners as adults,鈥 Clatterbuck said.  

 
Feb. 20, 2024 
National Institutes of Health鈥 
This study, authored in part by鈥Zo毛 Thijs,鈥Yan Zhang 补苍诲鈥疍别补苍 Christopher Watts鈥痜rom the鈥疕arris College of Nursing & Health Sciences, aimed to compare the affective, behavioral and cognitive reactions related to vocal function in people with Parkinson's (PWPD) disease (and healthy controls using the Behavior Assessment Battery - Voice (BAB-Voice).鈥疶he BAB-Voice proved a tool with a good internal consistency that measured different psychosocial reactions in PWPD versus controls. PWPD exhibited significantly more negative emotions and voice problems in specific speech situations, more coping behaviors and a more negative speech-related attitude. The specificity of information obtained from the BAB-Voice may aid in improving the treatment planning of voice disorders in PWPD. 

 
Feb. 15, 2024 
笔蝉测笔辞蝉迟鈥 
In a new study that sheds light on the often-misunderstood world of cryptocurrency ownership in the United States, researchers have unveiled a complex portrait that challenges the stereotypes surrounding the typical 鈥渃rypto bro.鈥 The research provides evidence that cryptocurrency owners are not just a homogenous group of young, tech-savvy males, but a diverse cohort that spans various demographics and political orientations. 鈥淚 started paying attention to Bitcoin and cryptocurrency in 2018, after a friend recommended that I read Saifedean Ammous鈥 book 鈥楾he Bitcoin Standard鈥,鈥 explained lead author鈥Grant Ferguson, a senior instructor and director of鈥痮utreach and public service internships. 鈥淎t the time, I didn鈥檛 realize that there was a strong worldview behind the creation and initial adoption of cryptocurrency and Bitcoin in particular, and it has psychological, economic and political aspects.鈥 

 
Feb. 14, 2024 
贵辞谤产别蝉鈥 
An increasing number of states and municipalities have implemented some form of rent control in an attempt to rein in the steadily increasing cost of rental housing across their communities. These rarely have the intended effect of increasing the supply of housing for low-income residents, however. In 2019 Oregon enacted statewide versions of rent control that capped the annual allowable rent increase. A study Ike Brannon recently wrote with鈥Zack Hawley鈥(TCU associate professor of economics) and Andrew Hanson of the University of Illinois found that the rent control legislation currently being considered would reduce housing supply and housing quality in Washington State, which would in turn reduce tax revenue.   

 STUDENTS 

 
Feb. 26, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
A gathering between TCU students and unhoused residents provides a meal and an uplifting sense of community and human connection. 鈥淭hey have access to local housing communities and job resources, but one of the things they feel like they do not have access to is relationships with people in stable situations,鈥 said鈥Kate Marshall, the student group leader. 鈥淎s a senior, I have been involved with 鈥楤ingo in the Park鈥 for three years, and I can truly say the butterfly effect is real,鈥 Marshall said. 鈥淣ot only has it impacted my life, and those that come, but it has introduced the topic of homelessness further into TCU鈥檚 community, creating opportunity for discussion, initiative and change.鈥 

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
BNN Breaking鈥 
Imagine a place where the pulsating rhythms of electronic dance music (EDM) serve as the heartbeat of a newfound community. This semester witnesses the birth of such a gathering spot, dubbed the TCU Electrotoads. Founded by鈥Emma Dickey, this club isn鈥檛 just about dropping beats; it鈥檚 a mission to weave the threads of peace, love, unity and respect into the fabric of campus life. With plans to collaborate with campus organizations like the Black Student Association and the Gender Resources Office, the Electrotoads aim to spotlight contributions from marginalized groups within the EDM community.  

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
BNN Breaking 
When Dawson and鈥Graham Smith鈥痩ined up at the start of the 46th annual Cowtown Marathon, they ran for something far greater than the finish line. It鈥檚 about honoring their brother,鈥疻es Smith, whose absence is felt deeply within the鈥疶CU鈥痑nd Fort Worth communities after he was killed in 2023. The brothers, alongside supporters, rally to keep Wes鈥檚 memory alive through the Wes Smith Endowment Fund. This initiative seeks to transform grief into an opportunity, providing future TCU students with scholarships, much like Wes and Graham had experienced. 

 
Feb. 15, 2024 
fisheries.noaa.gov 
A new genetic study鈥痵hows hatchery salmon鈥檚 adaptation to their environment can lead to potentially adaptive genetic differences between hatchery and wild salmon populations in only a few generations. The collaborative research was conducted by scientists from the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Alaska Department of Fish and Game and鈥疶CU.鈥淲e don't know if domestication selection acts consistently across hatcheries, or if responses of salmon are unique to each facility. The purpose of our study was to determine if levels of domestication selection varied among hatcheries and if there were any commonalities across the populations,鈥 said lead author and TCU student鈥Natasha Howe.鈥 

ALUMNI 

 
Feb. 29, 2024 
NBC-5 
A decision decades ago put a teenager in Fort Worth on a journey he never could have imagined: three degrees, a building named in his honor 鈥 and a permanent remembrance of the impact he made when he broke barriers at TCU. James Cash 鈥69 and his signature hook shot are immortalized in the statue in front of the TCU basketball arena. 鈥淲e are walking up to a statue of a very young, and much slimmer than today, James Cash. That was my number,鈥 said Cash. Cash grew up in the middle of the Civil Rights movement. And in 1965, he was making history. He was the first Black student-athlete at TCU and the first Black basketball player in the Southwest Conference.  

 
Feb. 29, 2024 
Fort Worth Report
Some say there are two types of social workers: those who want to help the people in the system and those who want to change the system people are in.鈥Lauren King 鈥03, executive director of the Tarrant County Homeless Coalition, considers herself the latter. 鈥淚 think looking back even to high school, looking at all the different volunteer opportunities that I (had) after my freshman year in college 鈥 I went and worked in Appalachia and helped rebuild houses there 鈥 it鈥檚 like I keep coming back to housing regardless of how I got into it.鈥 Housing has played an important role in King鈥檚 career. She started out working for SafeHaven of Tarrant County and Catholic Charities in programs and fundraising and also helped develop鈥疶CU鈥檚 Master of Social Work鈥痯rogram.鈥 

 
Feb. 27, 2024 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette鈥 
A new president is slated to take the helm of Washington & Jefferson College.鈥Elizabeth MacLeod Walls鈥01 Ph.D.,鈥痺ill take over as president of the private liberal arts college this June following the retirement of the current president. She was selected by the board of trustees to be the college鈥檚 14th president for her experience in higher education leadership and advocacy, according to a news release. 鈥淲ashington & Jefferson's stellar academic reputation and commitment to innovating within a liberal arts context positions the college to become a leader among independent colleges seeking to adapt to an ever-changing landscape,鈥 MacLeod Walls said in a statement. 

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
叠谤辞补诲飞补测奥辞谤濒诲.肠辞尘鈥 
Cincinnati Opera has鈥痑nnounced the launch of 罢丑别鈥疊lack Opera Project, a groundbreaking, three-opera commissioning initiative that engages Black creators to develop new works celebrating Black stories. The first new work to be featured as part of The Black Opera Project is鈥尝补濒辞惫补惫颈鈥 from a first-time opera creator, award-winning composer鈥Kevin Day鈥19. 

 
Feb. 21, 2024 
Fort Worth Report鈥 
础蝉鈥Ronald Hurdle鈥71,鈥痳ecalls it, he made a casual remark one day about joining the cheerleading team at鈥疶CU. That remark set Hurdle, now a semi-retired attorney from Dallas, on a journey that would see him becoming, in 1969, the first Black cheerleader not only at TCU but in the Southwest Conference. 鈥淚t was that casual when I said it,鈥 Hurdle, 75, recalled. 鈥淚 knew I鈥檇 gone to the games and I鈥檇 seen the cheerleaders while out there, and I thought they were having a good time.鈥  

 
Feb. 20, 2024 
Oregon Arts Watch鈥 
The 13th annual McMinnville Short Film Festival kicks off three days of screenings, workshops and socials. Of course, many filmmakers will be in attendance, including鈥Liz Cardenas鈥13. Her Oscar-qualifying short Burros was screened at last year鈥檚 festival, but she wasn鈥檛 able to attend that year. With a B.S. in broadcast journalism, her first career was journalism, and she worked as a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, until she gravitated to filmmaking. 鈥淚 love movies, always have. So, an appreciation and respect for the art form and a desire to tell stories that connect people, spread empathy, are uplifting or make people not feel so alone, are informative or even simply entertain, is why I鈥檓 a filmmaker,鈥 Cardenas said. 

 
Feb. 19, 2024 
Fort Worth Report鈥 
Longtime local reporter and television host Bobbie Wygant died at the age of 97. Longtime newsman鈥Bob Schieffer鈥59, former anchor of 鈥淔ace the Nation鈥 and the namesake of鈥疶CU鈥檚鈥疊ob Schieffer College of Communication, said Wygant had a big impact on his career.鈥淚 went out there and had the interview and they hired me, and I became the anchor,鈥 he said. 鈥淚 didn鈥檛 start at the bottom, I started at the top, which was kind of unbelievable. Bobbie was absolutely the reason that that happened.鈥濃 Schieffer also praised Wygant鈥檚 journalistic skills.鈥淪he was a very good interviewer,鈥 he said. 鈥淪he had all the right instincts. She asked all the right questions, and she was very fair.鈥 

 
Feb. 14, 2024 
WFAA-TV (Dallas, TX)鈥 
Cowtown is ready for its close-up. Thanks to a mix of factors that include efforts from the Fort Worth Film Commission, state tax incentives and a favorable business climate, the city has seen a slew of recent high-profile film and television productions call Fort Worth home. 鈥淚t鈥檚 really cool to see Fort Worth kind of tapping into the rich history here in new and engaging ways through media,鈥 said鈥Red Sanders鈥04, owner of Backlot Studios and Fort Worth-based Red Productions. Sanders is a TCU graduate and his business has called Fort Worth home for more than 20 years.  

 ATHLETICS 

 
Feb. 28, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
Every week there seems to be a new development that threatens to alter the fabric of college athletics. It can be a lot for fans to follow and for administrators like鈥疶CU Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Jeremiah Donati, it can bring a lot of sleepless nights as he thinks about the future of college sports. One particular case, House v. NCAA, is viewed by Donati as the next potential landmine. 鈥淩ight now there鈥檚 a tremendous amount of uncertainty around it,鈥 Donati said of the lawsuit. 鈥淭he numbers in damages, there are a lot of implications with it. It鈥檚 a little daunting thinking about adding that type of massive expense to your budget. It seems like that鈥檚 going to be the cost of doing business going forward and the cost of staying in the game.鈥 

 
Feb. 27, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
Each coaching cycle offers a chance to see how much the industry continues to progress in its diversity, especially with Black assistants. Every step of progress is followed by a reminder that there is still so much work to be done. Black assistants鈥Anthony Jones鈥痑苍诲鈥JaMarkus McFarland鈥痶ook different paths to Fort Worth. Before Jones was a running backs coach, he played football at Chattanooga, graduating in 2007. 鈥淚 started thinking about coaching when the NFL didn鈥檛 call,鈥 Jones said with a laugh. McFarland said, 鈥淚 always told myself I wouldn鈥檛 be a coach.鈥  

 
Feb. 20, 2024 
Fort Worth Magazine鈥 
The Horned Frogs may have not gone as far as they wanted to last season, however, this has only added to the team鈥檚 desire to get back to the heights they achieved over a season ago. 鈥淓very year you've got to prove yourself and go out and get better and I'm thankful for the last half of the season, the opportunity I had to play because I feel like it really helped me and I feel like I have some experience now going into the offseason,鈥 said quarterback Josh Hoover.  

 
Feb. 16, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram鈥 
Cancer took鈥Jamie Dixon鈥檚鈥痙ad, but watching his mother try to live any life with Parkinson鈥檚 disease may actually be worse. Both his mother in-law and father-in-law are struggling, too, and Dixon has traveling games throughout the week. Easily lost, forgotten and minimized in following a team is that the people who play and coach the games have lives that don鈥檛 stop and don鈥檛 look that much different than anyone else. In Dixon鈥檚 case, he is navigating a fact of life that too often is a little-discussed reality that can be a shadow stressor on families that can last for years: Caring for aging parents. 鈥淭here are no good answers,鈥 the men鈥檚 basketball coach said in an interview this week in his office. 鈥淭his is hard ... The guilt is just ... there is huge guilt.鈥 

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