茄子视频

Skip to main content

News

Main Content
inthenews
  • Share

From police pursuits to religious traditions and the First Amendment, TCU and its faculty, alumni and students are in the news.  

INSTITUTIONAL  

 
Jan. 28, 2024 
Fort Worth Report  
When Fort Worth鈥檚 population was no more than 400,000, Anne Marion was about to receive so much money that, at first, she didn鈥檛 know what to do with it. Marion inherited in 1980 the Burnett family ranching estate from her mother, Anne Valliant Burnett Tandy, who received an estate valued at over $28.4 million from her husband, Charles David Tandy, in 1978. With both estates, Marion helped found the Anne Burnett and Charles D. Tandy Foundation, known today as The Burnett Foundation. Today, throughout Fort Worth, the Burnett-Tandy-Marion name is seemingly everywhere. This year, a new building will sprout bearing the family name. The Anne Burnett Marion School of Medicine at TCU is set for completion in 2024.  

 
Jan. 26, 2024 
Capital Analytics  
Several exciting business initiatives are taking off in the city of Fort Worth, including a new $80 million distribution facility, and projects promising hundreds of new jobs in the aerospace sector. Robert Sturns 鈥97 MBA, director of economic development in the city of Fort Worth, said the secret sauce is a great team working together to push things forward. 鈥淲e have a great business-friendly environment. Our mayor and council are aggressive in working to get deals moving. We have a great team that is passionate about the work that they do, and we have great partnerships with our real estate community. I think all those things come together and are underpinned by the hard work of the team. That鈥檚 our secret sauce, to make sure the region has the right workforce to keep pace with all that growth,鈥 Sturns said, 鈥淲e work very closely with the Neeley School of Business on developing some of those pipelines to ensure that students graduate with the right skills, want to stay in the area and have the right job opportunities.鈥 

 
Jan. 22, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram  
Taylor Sheridan鈥檚 latest production, 鈥淟and Man,鈥 is looking for students to cast for an on-campus scene being filmed in February. Local agency Legacy Casting announced this week that 鈥淟and Man鈥 is filming a track and field scene on the TCU campus Feb. 15. Legacy is looking to cast both TCU alumni and current students as background actors when the show stops by Fort Worth. Show producers are opening the set to allow students to shadow crew members as production rolls on campus.  

 
Jan. 23, 2024 
Fort Worth Report  
The Reel Religion Film Festival is a two-day event co-sponsored by University Christian Church, Broadway Baptist Church and TCU鈥檚 Extended Education. The late Kenneth Lawrence, who was a former chairman of TCU鈥檚 religion department and professor emeritus of the university, used 鈥淪tar Wars鈥 films in his class to help make connections to film and faith, said his wife, Carol Jane. Kenneth and Carol Jane teamed up with others to create the first iteration of the festival in 2004 with 12 films. Two decades later, the festival has grown to include 17 films and four short films 鈥 21 films total. Carol Jane continues working to help put the festival in honor of her husband, who passed away two years after the initiative started.  

 
Jan. 3, 2024 
FoodService Director  
Students were treated to an immune-boosting mocktail event earlier this month. The event was part of the school鈥檚 Healthy Frogs program and was led by Maddie Jacobs, campus dietician, and Connor Green, executive chef, inside the dining hall. Coinciding with Dry January, students could try a variety of alcohol-free mixed drinks, including the Blueberry-Infused Nojito, Cranberry Moscow Mock-mule, Espresso Martinot and Sparkling Grape Faux-mosa. Each mocktail was made with immune-boosting ingredients.  

 
Jan. 3, 2024 
FoodService Director  
A student survey from last semester revealed that students have noted a significant increase in satisfaction with dining options, education about nutrition and feeling like they have access to healthy food on campus. How did the dining team do it? The team cultivated a focus on nutrition education through its revamped Healthy Frogs program. 鈥淲hen I stepped into this role, my main goal was that I wanted to utilize campus partnerships and especially student involvement to make sure that this was a truly student-led program that was made by the students for the students and would help to benefit students in every area of wellness,鈥 said Maddie Jacobs, campus dietitian at TCU. Jacobs was able to accomplish this goal by connecting with various campus partners such as its mental health and campus recreation centers. 鈥淕etting all these connections made sure that we were able to meet students where they were in every area of wellness, and really make it a more comprehensive program than it鈥檚 ever been,鈥 said Jacobs. 

FACULTY   

 
Jan. 30, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram 
The Fort Worth Police Department鈥檚 internal affairs division may have to investigate whether officers followed the department鈥檚 pursuit policy after a high-speed chase ended with two pedestrians suffering serious injuries, according to law enforcement policy experts. The officer鈥檚 decision to go against traffic was likely in line with the department鈥檚 pursuit policy, according to Johnny Nhan, graduate program director and professor of criminology and criminal justice. Nhan is also a reserve Fort Worth police officer and patrols about once a week. 鈥淕enerally speaking, if they鈥檙e just kind of following the person, they could probably follow behind them,鈥 he said in a phone interview. 鈥淐onsidering the totality of the circumstances, I don鈥檛 see that as something that somebody would get in trouble for.鈥 The pursuing officer has lots of room to make decisions based on his or her analysis of the situation, he said. 鈥淥nce the lights and sirens are on, there鈥檚 a lot more leeway in how an officer can drive.鈥 

 
Jan. 30, 2024 
KXAS-TV (Fort Worth, TX)  
Head football coach Sonny Dykes picked up a side hustle in the off season. He鈥檚 the chair of the 2024 NCAA Readers Become Leaders program hosted by the Fort Worth Sports Commission. 鈥淚 get to come to some elementary schools and try to encourage young people to get involved in reading and just to make sure they understand how important it is and what a difference it鈥檚 going to make in their lives,鈥 Dykes said. More than 37,000 students at 83 Fort Worth ISD elementary schools will take part this year, making it the largest community outreach program in NCAA history. 鈥淚 think the biggest thing when you鈥檙e young is to find that love for reading, you know, find the sweet spot and read things that you really enjoy reading. And then, as you get older, you really read to learn instead of learning to read,鈥 Dykes said. 鈥淭hat鈥檚 what I would tell these young people is find things that they can connect with and they identify with. Read as much as you can and then you get to see things from a different perspective and learn about that as well.鈥 

 
Jan. 29, 2024 
University of Arkansas (News) 
The Community Literacies Collaboratory, the signature program of the university鈥檚 Brown Chair in English Literacy, today launches the publication of its new scholarly peer-reviewed digital journal, The Sandbox: Short Papers, Big Ideas on Literacies and Learning. The journal will be published three times a year 鈥 in winter, summer and fall 鈥 in both digital and print formats. The inaugural issue features four original essays by literacy, rhetoric and composition scholars, including one by award-winning community literacies scholar and longtime educator Carmen Kynard, professor and Lillian Radford Chair of Rhetoric and Composition, and a member of the CLC's Advisory Board. Kynard's contribution was initially published on her popular blog, Education, Liberation & Black Radical Traditions for the 21st Century. 

 
Jan. 27, 2024 
Fort Worth Report  
A local resident made history in the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth by becoming its first consecrated virgin. Although having a consecrated virgin is new to the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth, the form of religious life dates back to the early centuries of the world, said Erik Estrada, assistant professor of religion. 鈥淚n especially the third century in the West, you find mentions of people who had consecrated or dedicated their lives to a celibate lifestyle,鈥 Estrada said. 鈥淭hey didn鈥檛 marry, they didn鈥檛 engage in any form of sexual activity, but they used their time, instead, to engage in spiritual activities,鈥 Estrada said. 鈥淲ithin the ecclesial realm and the fullest spiritual sense, virginity is devotion to God and commitment to God.鈥   

 
Jan. 24, 2024 
The Texas Observer  
In a blow to First Amendment advocates, a majority of the judges on the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals decided not just to throw out a lawsuit by the Laredo citizen journalist and provocateur who goes by the name La Gordiloca, but to endorse an expansive view of government power that permits police to arrest reporters for seeking basic information through backchannels. 鈥淎ny law enforcement agency basically has a green light right now to go out and arrest and threaten or detain journalists who publish documents that are leaked from the government,鈥 said Daxton 鈥淐hip鈥 Stewart, professor and assistant provost for research compliance journalism, in an interview about the ruling. 鈥淎nd 鈥 if that journalist spends a night in jail, they don鈥檛 have a remedy and can鈥檛 sue for a civil rights violation.鈥 

 
Jan. 19, 2024 
The Sand Mountain Reporter  
The Albertville High School Alumni Hall of Fame will honor four new inductees and their contributions in the fields of social work, civil service, education and health care, including Gene Allen Smith, author, history professor and director of the Center for Texas Studies at TCU. 

STUDENTS        

 
Jan. 30, 2024 
The Jago Times 
Students enrolled in a documentary production class in the Department of Film, Television, and Digital Media were tasked with creating a narrative about a nonprofit organization, and subject became Austin Underwood, an individual living with Down syndrome. 鈥淯nderdawg鈥 premiered at TCU and will subsequently be featured in the local film festival circuit before becoming publicly accessible. Brie Elecktra, the film director and a TCU student, said, 鈥淚 believe people will be surprised to witness how adaptable anyone can be if you meet them where they are.鈥  

 
Jan. 24, 2024 
The Advocate  
Camille Elizabeth Morrison, a sophomore finance and management major, is the queen of this year鈥檚 Washington Mardi Gras. Washington Mardi Gras is an annual event where Louisiana lawmakers, lobbyists and business executives, friends and families meet in the nation鈥檚 capital for intense Mardi Gras celebrations, balls and more parties than any one person can attend. 鈥淔inding out I was this year鈥檚 queen was not something I ever expected. My family did a good job of keeping it a secret from me and surprised me on Good Friday by handing me a cookie cake with 鈥淎ll hail queen Camille鈥 on it in front of my entire extended family,鈥 said Morrison. 

 
Jan. 18, 2024 
Patch  
TCU鈥檚 Dining鈥檚 annual pop-up restaurant is Al Moro 鈥 鈥渢o the toad.鈥 Dining Services collaborated closely with the Student Government Association Dining Committee to determine the concept for this year鈥檚 pop-up restaurant. A brief survey was conducted to gauge student preferences, and pasta emerged as the clear winner, securing over 3% more votes than the other contenders. Irene Nacif, a graphic design/design studies and marketing major, took the reins of designing the visual identity for Al Moro. As the graphic design intern for the project, Nacif curated all the designs, giving life to the chosen pasta concept. 

ALUMNI   

 
Jan. 31, 2024 
Fort Worth Report  
North Texas Community Foundation welcomes Whitnee Boyd Ed.D. 鈥17, as the director of community impact. In her role, Boyd will oversee the direction and implementation of the foundation鈥檚 grant cycles to create positive outcomes for North Texas. 鈥淲orking alongside the community is where I find joy and purpose. I see this role as an opportunity to continue this important work of driving transformative impact. I look forward to working collaboratively with the team at the North Texas Community Foundation and our partners to make a lasting impact on the communities we serve.鈥   

 
Jan. 28, 2024 
Fort Worth Report  
Emily Mendez 鈥13 brought home the Emmy for her work as an editor on 鈥淭he Last of Us鈥 and recently shared her success story with current Horned Frogs. The video game that the HBO series is based on was first released in 2013, the same year that Mendez graduated from the film, television and digital media department at TCU. Mendez knew early on that she wanted to pursue editing as a career, but as a player of the video game she would have never predicted that someday she鈥檇 work on a series based on its storyline. 鈥淚 felt like I already knew the characters because of the game, and that was helpful for me,鈥 she told a room full of students gathered on the TCU campus. 

 
Jan. 22, 2024 
FW Inc.  
Founded by four core members who met at a summer music program in Taos, New Mexico, more than nine years ago, ensemble132 includes Sahun Sam Hong 鈥11 on piano. The name might ring a bell because he was only 16 years old when he graduated magna cum laude with a double major in math and piano performance from TCU. Born in South Korea in 1994, his family moved to Fort Worth in 2002 from Orlando so his father could continue his schooling at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. John Owings, a pianist teaching at TCU, became Hong鈥檚 teacher. Owings retired in August after 33 years with TCU鈥檚 School of Music. He received the Chancellor鈥檚 Award for Distinguished Creative Activity in 1993 for his performances of the 32 Beethoven piano sonatas. Since graduating, Hong has been busy living his dream playing live music with trusted friends/musicians who share the same artistic vision. 鈥淲e started playing as a trio in 2015, which lasted about four years,鈥 Hong says. 鈥淏ut in 2019, we decided to do a new kind of project.鈥 

 
Jan. 24, 2024 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram  
Like any competitor, Hayden Springer 鈥19 dreams of success as he embarks on the Professional Golf Association Tour. However, he would give it all up if his young daughter Sage could have survived the genetic condition trisomy 18. Sage died in November. Hayden and his wife Emma of Trophy Club are now helping other families facing the challenge of trisomy conditions through their nonprofit organization Extra to Love, based out of Justin. Hayden was a standout golfer at TCU from 2017 to 2019 and won the Big 12 Conference championship in 2019. 鈥淗aving a daughter with this diagnosis and walking this journey with her gave me a lot of perspective. Golf is important, and I care a lot about it, but at the end of the day, I know that my family and my faith are what really matters,鈥 Hayden said. 

 
Jan. 22, 2024 
Arkansas Business  
Heath Simpson 鈥95 (MBA 鈥01) was promoted to chief executive officer at Ritter Communications of Jonesboro. He joined the communications company as chief financial officer in 2020. 鈥淚 am humbled by the opportunity to transition into the CEO role, and I am eager to leverage my skills and dedication for the collective success of Ritter Communications,鈥 Simpson said. 

 
Jan. 22, 2024 
oklahoma.gov 
Today, Governor Kevin Stitt announced Allie Friesen 鈥11, as the new commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Friesen has worked as the director of Clinical Programs in Behavioral Health at INTEGRIS since 2020, developing effective and evidence-based practices across their healthcare system. 鈥淭he incidence of mental health disorders across our nation and across our great state continues to climb,鈥 Friesen said. 鈥淭here is outstanding work taking place across Oklahoma to address the existing crisis, and to prevent potential suffering for generations to come. I am passionate about transforming systems of care to optimize access to high quality services and it is time for solutions to be accelerated.鈥 

 
Jan. 20, 2024 
FortWorth Report        
Julie Kennedy MBA 鈥03 (DNP 鈥22) is the owner and founder of Seed Wellness Co. Launched in 2023, her business offers individual health coaching, functional medicine and nurse practitioner services. When she was 19, she was diagnosed with discoid lupus, which is an autoimmune issue, while in undergraduate nursing school. 鈥淚 started taking medication and I got really sick 鈥 I started to lose my hair and I was dizzy all the time,鈥 Kennedy said. 鈥淲hen I was at the doctor鈥檚 office, I thought to myself: 鈥楾his can鈥檛 be my life. I am 19. Where is this going to go from here?鈥 That鈥檚 when I started researching and integrating functional approaches to my health.鈥  

 
Jan. 19, 2024 
The Shorthorn  
Behind bright dresses that flow through the air and heels that ring through the crowd are various generations sharing their culture and traditions through dance. Baile folkl贸rico is a traditional Mexican dance that can be traced back to the Aztecs. For Anastasia Flores 鈥21 director of Anastasia Flores Dance Co., keeping the tradition alive helps her dancers understand who they are and where they came from. 鈥淓verybody has their own specific culture, the way they wear their costumes, their hair, their makeup, everything,鈥 Flores said. 鈥淏ut then when it comes back down to it, everybody鈥檚 able to communicate through dance together. It鈥檚 just so beautiful.鈥 

Tag IconIn The News